Great Books

GREAT BOOKS 1 COURSE SYLLABUS

Bio of 100 Great Books authors whose lives overlap - Homer to C.S. Lewis

Part 1: Course Information
Instructor Information

Instructor: Rev. Dr. Paul Michael Raymond
Office Hours: To Be Announced
Contact: 503-433-7733 / E-mail: Pastor@HisGlory.com

Course Description
Each of 6 Great Books courses analyzes about 16 classical authors (total 100) and consists of two parts. First is a thumbnail sketch of each author with review exercise and computer-graded quiz. Second is in-depth analysis and class discussion of 8 of the authors using a set of 10 thought questions as a reading and discussion guide. There are 2 “sweeps” through history, each covering 50 of the 100 total authors. The first set of 50 sketches are in the e-book “Keys to the Classics, Vol. I.” Short answers to the open-end questions are in a separate Teachers Manual. The courses are omnibus, blending world history, philosophy,literature, and theology. Reading ranges from 35 to 50 pages every two weeks. An optional textbook by Francis William Coker, “Readings In Political Philosophy” contains all the required readings. GBI, covers the ancient world from Homer to Machiavelli. The work of the Greek philosophers and Roman political theorists was answered by the life and ministry of Christ. The newly launched church challenged the Emperor cult until the conversion of Constantine (312), who marked a dramatic turning point in the history of Christianity. Previously persecuted by Rome, the church now found herself intertwined with the state for about 700 years. Emperors appointed Bishops, often the highest bidder. Finally, the church broke free in the Investiture struggle of 1075-1122. You’ll meet key players who shaped the new church/state dynamic leading up to the modern era.
  • Tuition:       $275 Premier                OR             Tuition:       $25 Basic
  • Level:          7-8                                                       Level:          7-8
  • Mode:         Asynchronous                                 Mode:         Self-taught
  • Offered:     Fall                                                      Offered:     Fall or Spring
  • Textbook:  See above                                          Textbook:   See above
Textbook & Course Materials

Required Text:
“Key’s to the Classics, Vol 1 – Student’s” by D.O. “Oliver” Woods.
“Key’s to the Classics, Vol 1 – Teacher’s” by D.O. “Oliver” Woods.
  • Internet connection (DSL, LAN, or cable connection desirable)
  • Desktop or laptop computer

Course Structure

  • The course is delivered in 16 weeks, divided into 4 units corresponding to Rhetorical Context, Organization, Style, and Canons
  • Each unit consists of reading a chapter in the online ebook, followed by a video lecture, ungraded review exercises and a chapter quiz. The instructor is available on the student discussion platform to answer questions and/or interact with groups of students.
Part 2: Student Learning Outcomes
At the conclusion of the course the student will be able to
1) Explain how the rhetorical situation governs a presentation
2) Differentiate between proper and improper use of rhetoric
3) List & explain the best ways to begin a speech
4) Organize an effective speech
5) List the 10 most important principles effecting the style of a speech.
6) Define the role of memory in preparing for a speech
7) Demonstrate how the Canons of Rhetoric interact in an effective speech.
8) Complete the Term Project: Stuff They Don’t Teach You In School: Principles of Persuasion in salesmanship

Student will meet the objectives listed above through a combination of the following activities in this course:
  • Attendance and participation in the class forum
  • Study of assigned online reading
  • Listen to video lectures
  • Completion of review exercises
  • Completion of 14 Chapter quizzes
  • Completion of the Term Project
Part 3: Topic Outline/Schedule
UNIT I: Pagan World
Assignment Week 1): Read the Socrates Introduction essay, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz. READING ASSIGNMENT: Plato’s Apology
Assignment Week 2): Read the Homer Introduction essay, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz
Complete the reading in Plato’s Apology and 1 paragraph written response to each of the 10 discussion questions. What don’t you understand – present it as a question on the Piazza forum? Present your responses to parents for comparison with Teacher’s Guide & mark completion.
Start work on your Term Project
Assignment Week 3): Read the Plato Introduction essay, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz
READING ASSIGNMENT: The Republic of Plato, II, 367-374;III, 412 to IV,421; IV, 427-434, V, 457-465, V, 472-473, VI, 484-490, VII, 520-521, 536-537, 540-541, Assignment Week 4): Read the Aristophanes Introduction essay, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz
Complete the reading in Plato’s Republic and 1 paragraph written response to each of the 10 discussion questions. What don’t you understand – present it as a question on the Piazza forum? Present your writtenresponse to parents for comparison with Teacher’s Guide & mark completion.
Assignment Week 5): Read the Aristotle Introduction essay, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz.
READING ASSIGNMENT: The Politics, I,ii,iii,v; II,v,vi,vii; III,i,iii,v-viii,xxii,xiv-xvii; IV,i,vii-viii,ix,xi,xii; V,ii,iii,viii-ix; VI,ii-iii; VII,iv-v
Assignment Week 6): Read the Virgil Introduction essay, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz. Complete the reading in Aristotle’s The Politics and 1 paragraph written response to each of the 10 discussion questions. What don’t you understand – present it as a question on the Piazza forum? ? Present your responses to parents for comparison with Teacher’s Guide & mark completion.
UNIT II: Prince of Peace Establishes His Kingdom
Assignment Week 7): Read the Cicero Introduction essay, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz.
READING ASSIGNMENT: Republic: Bk I, Chap 1-2, 5-7, 20, 25-35, 42-45; Bk III, Chap 22 Laws: Bk I, Chap 4-11, Bk III, Chap 1
Assignment Week 8): Read the Introduction essay on Jesus Christ, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz. Complete the readings in Cicero and 1 paragraph written response to each of the 10 discussion questions. What don’t you understand – present it as a question on the Piazza forum? Present your responses to parents for comparison with Teacher’s Guide & mark completion. Progress Check: Term Project should be about half done.
UNIT III: The Patristic World
Assignment Week 9): Read the Constantine Introduction essay, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz. READING ASSIGNMENT: Westminster Confession of Faith, Ch 23 Foundations of Social Order, Ch 2 (Nicean Creed)(7) Decline & Fall of the Roman Empire, Ch 2
Assignment Week 10): Read the Justinian Introduction essay, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz.
Complete the readings on Constantine and 1 paragraph written response to each of the 10 discussion questions. What don’t you understand – present it as a question on the Piazza forum? ? Present your responses to parents for comparison with Teacher’s Guide & mark completion.
Assignment Week 11): Read the Augustine Introduction essay, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz.
UNIT IV: The Papal World
READING ASSIGNMENT: The City of God: Bk iv, chap 3-4, Bk xiv, chap 28, Bk xv, chap I, 4
Assignment Week 12): Read the John of Salisbury Introduction essay, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz. Complete the readings on Augustine in The City of God and 1 paragraph written response to each of the 10 discussion questions. What don’t you understand – present it as a question on the Piazza forum? Present your responses to parents for comparison with Teacher’s Guide & mark completion.
Assignment Week 13): Read the Anselm Introduction essay, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz.
READING ASSIGNMENT: Proslogium, In Behalf of the Fool (Gaunilon)Apologetic, Ch I, V, IX
Assignment Week 14): Read the Thomas Aquinas Introduction essay, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz. Complete the readings on Anselm’s Proslogium, and 1 paragraph written response to each of the 10 discussion questions. What don’t you understand – present it as a question on the Piazza forum? Present your responses to parents for comparison with Teacher’s Guide & mark completion.
UNIT V: The Renaissance
Week 15): Read the Machiavelli Introduction essay, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz
Read the Dante Introduction essay, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz.
READING ASSIGNMENT: The Prince, Chap xv-xix, xxi
Assignment Week 16) : Read the William Wallace Introduction essay, do theUngraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz. Read the Marsiglio Introduction essay, do the Ungraded REVIEW Exercise and take the quiz. Complete the readings on Machiavelli, The Prince and 1 paragraph written response to each of the 10 discussion questions. What don’t you understand – present it as a question on the Piazza forum? Present your responses to parents for comparison with Teacher’s Guide & mark completion. Complete at least one of the activities in the Term Project essay, “The Apolitical Pastor Equipped.” to your parent’s satisfaction and mark when complete.
Part 4: Grading Policy
Graded Course Activities The course grade is determined as follows

The course grade is determined as follows

Participation in discussion

10%

Quizzes

Reading, Lectures: REVIEW Exercises

45% (15 x 3pts)

15% (15 x 1pt)

Learning Outcomes: Speech Prep

14%(7goals x 2pt)

Term Project

16%

TOTAL

100%

Late Work Policy: Be sure to pay close attention to deadlines—there will be no make up assignments or quizzes, or late work accepted without a serious and compelling reason and instructor approval. Your instructor will update the online grades each time a grading session has been complete—typically 2 days following the completion of an activity. You will see a visual indication of new grades posted in Moodle.Your instructor will update the online grades each time a grading session has been complete—typically 2 days following the completion of an activity. You will see a visual indication of new grades posted in Moodle. Letter Grade Assignment Final grades assigned for this course will be based on the percentage of total points earned and are assigned as follows:

Letter Grade Percentage Performance

Part 5: Course Policies Participate Instructor will be using a tracking tool, discussions, chat sessions, and group work, to monitor your participation in the course. Build Rapport If you find that you have any trouble keeping up with assignments or other aspects of the course, make sure you let your instructor know as early as possible. As you will find, building rapport and effective relationships are key to becoming an effective professional. Make sure that you are proactive in informing your instructor when difficulties arise during the semester so that they can help you find a solution. Complete Assignments Assignments must be submitted by the given deadline or special permission must be requested from instructor before the due date. Extensions will not be given beyond the next assignment except under extreme circumstances. All discussion assignments must be completed by the assignment due date and time. Late or missing discussion assignments will affect the student’s grade. Understand When You May Drop This Course It is the student’s responsibility to understand when they need to consider disenrolling from a course. After this period, a serious and compelling reason is required to drop from the course. Incomplete Policy Under emergency/special circumstances, students may petition for an incomplete grade. Inform Your Instructor of Any Accommodations Needed Commit to Integrity As a student in this course (and at this Academy) you are expected to maintain high degrees of professionalism, commitment to active learning and participation in this class and also integrity in your behavior in and out of the classroom. Academic Dishonesty Policy Academic dishonesty includes such things as cheating, inventing false information or citations, plagiarism and helping someone else commit an act of academic dishonesty. It usually involves an attempt by a student to show possession of a level of knowledge or skill that he/she does not possess. Course instructors have the initial responsibility for detecting and dealing with academic dishonesty. Instructors who believe that an act of academic dishonesty has occurred are obligated to discuss the matter with the student(s) involved. Instructors should possess reasonable evidence of academic dishonesty. However, if circumstances prevent consultation with student(s), instructors may take whatever action (subject to student appeal) they deem appropriate. Instructors who are convinced by the evidence that a student is guilty of academic dishonesty shall assign an appropriate academic penalty. If the instructors believe that the academic dishonesty reflects on the student’s academic performance or the academic integrity in a course, the student’s grade should be adversely affected. Suggested guidelines for appropriate actions are: an oral reprimand in cases where there is reasonable doubt that the student knew his/her action constituted academic dishonesty; a failing grade on the particular paper, project or examination where the act of dishonesty was unpremeditated, or where there were significant mitigating circumstances; a failing grade in the course where the dishonesty was premeditated or planned. The instructors will file incident reports with the Vice Presidents for Academic Affairs and for Student Affairs or their designees. These reports shall include a description of the alleged incident of academic dishonesty, any relevant documentation, and any recommendations for action that he/she deems appropriate.