Meet 100 of History's Most Influential Thinkers

Great Books 1

Instructor: D.O. (Oliver) Woods 
E-mail: Admin@KingsWayClassicalAcademy.com 
Phone: 503-658-0385

Course Description

Each of 6 Great Books courses analyzes about 16 classical authors (total 100) and consists of two parts.   First is a thumbnail sketch of each author with review exercise and computer-graded quiz.  Second is in-depth analysis and class discussion of 8 of the authors using a set of 10 thought questions as a reading and discussion guide. 

There are 2 “sweeps” through history, each covering 50 of the 100 total authors.   The first set of 50 sketches are in the e-book “Keys to the Classics, Vol. I.”  Short answers to the open-end questions are in a separate Teachers Manual.  The courses are omnibus, blending world history, philosophy, literature, and theology.  Student selects one author on which to write a 2,000 word essay. Reading ranges from 35 to 50 pages every two weeks. An optional textbook by Francis William Coker, "Readings In Political Philosophy" contains all the required readings.

GBI, covers the ancient world from Homer to Machiavelli. The work of the Greek philosophers and Roman political theorists was answered by the life and ministry of Christ. The newly launched church challenged the Emperor cult until the conversion of Constantine (312), who marked a dramatic turning point in the history of Christianity. Previously persecuted by Rome, the church now found herself intertwined with the state for about 700 years. Emperors appointed Bishops, often the highest bidder. Finally, the church broke free in the Investiture struggle of 1075-1122. You'll meet key players who shaped the new church/state dynamic leading up to the modern era.  

  • Tuition:    $275 Premier   OR   Tuition:     $25 Basic
  • Mode:      Instructor                  Mode:      Self-taught
  • Offered:   Fall                           Offered:   Fall or Spring
  • Textbook: See above               Textbook:  See above




Great Books 2

Instructor: Mr. D.O. "Oliver" Woods 
E-mail: Admin@KingsWayClassicalAcademy.com
Phone: 503-658-0385

Course Description

Each of 6 Great Books courses analyzes about 16 classical authors (of total 100) and consists of two parts.   First is a thumbnail sketch of each author with review exercise and computer-graded quiz.  Second is in-depth analysis and class discussion of 8 of the authors using a set of 10 thought questions as a reading and discussion guide. 

There are 2 “sweeps” through history, each covering 50 of the 100 total authors.   The first set of 50 sketches are in the e-book “Keys to the Classics, Vol. I.”  Short answers to the open-end questions are in a separate Teachers Manual.  The courses are omnibus, blending world history, philosophy, literature, and theology.  Student selects one author on which to write a 2,000 word essay. Reading ranges from 35 to 50 pages every two weeks. An optional textbook by Francis William Coker, "Readings In Political Philosophy" contains all the required readings for the first set of 50 authors.

GB2, covers the Reformation and age of Revolution from Luther to Locke. The corruption of the Roman Catholic Church under the Medici popes was challenged by Martin Luther (1517) and the Protestant Reformation.  The Catholic Church struck back with the moral reforms of the Council of Trent, extending from 1545 to 1563.  Unfortunately, doctrinal errors were reinforced and the sinister Jesuit order was launched.  A wave of humanism was also sweeping Europe, with recovery of classical documents and an explosion of artistic expression.  Francis Bacon's New Atlantis is established in America.    ·    

  • Tuition:    $275 Premier   OR   Tuition:     $25 Basic
  • Mode:      Synchronous            Mode:      Self-taught
  • Offered:   Fall                           Offered:   Fall or Spring
  • Textbook: See above               Textbook:  See above



Great Books 3

Instructor: Mr. D.O. "Oliver" Woods 
E-mail: Admin@KingsWayClassicalAcademy.com
Phone: 503-658-0385

Course Description

Each of 6 Great Books courses analyzes about 16 classical authors (of total 100) and consists of two parts.   First is a thumbnail sketch of each author with review exercise and computer-graded quiz.  Second is in-depth analysis and class discussion of 8 of the authors using a set of 10 thought questions as a reading and discussion guide. 

There are 2 “sweeps” through history, each covering 50 of the 100 total authors.   The first set of 50 sketches are in the e-book “Keys to the Classics, Vol. I.”  Short answers to the open-end questions are in a separate Teachers Manual.  The courses are omnibus, blending world history, philosophy, literature, and theology.  Student selects one author on which to write a 2,000 word essay. Reading ranges from 35 to 50 pages every two weeks. An optional textbook by Francis William Coker, "Readings In Political Philosophy" contains all the required readings for the first set of 50 authors.

GB3, covers the rationalism of the Enlightenment to the relativism of the deep-state present.  "Man is the Measure" was the byword of the 18th Century Neo-Classical revival, with Rousseau and Voltaire pointing the way.  The giddy optimism was shattered by the bloody French Revolution, culminating in 1799.  Other democratic revolutions followed in the 19th Century, a mere prelude to the barbarity of the 20th.   This course traces all the philosophical streams that fed into the making of America and nurtured the looming crisis.  ..

  • Tuition:    $275 Premier   OR   Tuition:     $25 Basic
  • Mode:      Synchronous            Mode:      Self-taught
  • Offered:   Fall                           Offered:   Fall or Spring
  • Textbook: See above               Textbook:  See above


Great Books 4

Instructor: Mr. D.O. "Oliver" Woods 
E-mail: Admin@KingsWayClassicalAcademy.com
Phone: 503-658-0385

Course Description

This is an omnibus course blending world history, philosophy, literature, and theology. Coursework integrates material from the Introductory course by requiring student to read and interact with excerpts from the Great Books, most available on-line. Instructor typically selects about half of the authors from the Intro course for in-depth reading. The student approaches reading with the objective of writing a paragraph response to a set of discussion questions, which become part of the permanent portfolio. Seminar discussion with tutor or class meets daily in the online forum. 

Student selects one author per course, for which he expands his written response into a 2000 word essay. Reading assignment ranges from 35 to 50 pages every two weeks for each classical author. Although they may be taken separately, the Great Books Colloquium is usually taken concurrently with the corresponding Great Books Introduction. Supplementary Textbooks: Keys to the Classics II, Student and Teacher's Manual and "Worldviews in Conflict" by Kevin Swanson.

With Great Books 4 we start over with a second sweep through the history of western civilization in somewhat greater depth (15 of 100 classical authors). This course covers the period between the ancient Greek Aeschylus and Stephen Langton, primary author of Magna Carta (1215). In this course we focus on the ancient Greek and Roman playrights and historians and also some of the heresies that plagued the early church. These included Epicureanism, Stocism, and especially neo-Platonism, among others. The church had its defenders in historians like Eusebius and Bede the Venerable, but the first thousand years were marked by a neo-Platonic retreat from the physical world. Christianity struggled to defend itself in the face of Muslim advances (Song of Roland) and Nordic/pagan influences (Beowulf).

  • Tuition:     $275 Premier    OR   Tuition:      $25 Basic
  • Mode:       asynchronous            Mode:       Self-taught
  • Offered:    Fall                            Offered:    Fall or Spring
  • Textbook:  See above                 Textbook:  See above


Great Books 5

Instructor: Mr. D.O. "Oliver" Woods 
E-mail: Admin@KingsWayClassicalAcademy.com
Phone: 503-658-0385

Course Description

This is an omnibus course blending world history, philosophy, literature, and theology. Coursework integrates material from the Introductory course by requiring student to read and interact with excerpts from the Great Books, most available on-line. Instructor typically selects about half of the authors from the Intro course for in-depth reading. The student approaches reading with the objective of writing a paragraph response to a set of discussion questions, which become part of the permanent portfolio. Seminar discussion with tutor or class meets daily in the online forum. 

Student selects one author per course, for which he expands his written response into a 2000 word essay. Reading assignment ranges from 35 to 50 pages every two weeks for each classical author. Although they may be taken separately, the Great Books Colloquium is usually taken concurrently with the corresponding Great Books Introduction. Supplementary Textbooks: Keys to the Classics II, Student and Teacher's Manual and "Worldviews in Conflict" by Kevin Swanson.

In our second sweep through the later medieval period we look even more closely at the philosophical undercurrents that foreshadowed the modern era. The stage was set with the nominalism of William of Occam and the curtain came down on the work of Johann Goethe in Germany. Occam challenged the Aristotelian particularism introduced to the church by Thomas Aquinas. He launched a long era of secularism by denying that universals have any real existence. Men begin to live out the implications. Some like Thomas A Kempis by retreating into a radical pietism. Others like Leonardo Da Vinci by trying to make sense of the world without reference to God. John Foxe recorded the martyrdom of those who held to the Biblical standard. The course examines how that standard was planted in the New World by pioneers like John Winthrop and Cotton Mather. Unfortunately, its potential was stunted by the Enlightenment rationalism of Montesquieu, Voltaire, and ultimately James Madison.

  • Tuition:     $275 Premier    OR   Tuition:      $25 Basic
  • Mode:       asynchronous            Mode:       Self-taught
  • Offered:    Fall                            Offered:    Fall or Spring
  • Textbook:  See above                 Textbook:   See above

 


Great Books 6

Instructor: Mr. D.O. "Oliver" Woods 
E-mail: Admin@KingsWayClassicalAcademy.com
Phone: 503-658-0385

Course Description

This is an omnibus course blending world history, philosophy, literature, and theology. Coursework integrates material from the Introductory course by requiring student to read and interact with excerpts from the Great Books, most available on-line. Instructor typically selects about half of the authors from the Intro course for in-depth reading. The student approaches reading with the objective of writing a paragraph response to a set of discussion questions, which become part of the permanent portfolio. Seminar discussion with tutor or class meets daily in the online forum. 

Student selects one author per course, for which he expands his written response into a 2000 word essay. Reading assignment ranges from 35 to 50 pages every two weeks for each classical author. Although they may be taken separately, the Great Books Colloquium is usually taken concurrently with the corresponding Great Books Introduction. Supplementary Textbooks: Keys to the Classics II, Student and Teacher's Manual and "Worldviews in Conflict" by Kevin Swanson.

Our second overview of the modern era begins with G.W.F. Hegel and ends with the Russian expatriate, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. Sadly, it is a tale of philosophical apostasy issuing in real world tragedy. Hegel set the stage with his theory that history is a long series of clashing and competing forces. Apart from God this is inevitable. It led of course to Darwin, but also to manipulation of reality by leaders in the various disciplines: Kierkegaard in philosophy, Mill in economics, Nietzsche in political theory, Freud in psychology, Dewey in education. The course revisits perceptive voices of protest that were raised along the way -- Scott, Tocqueville, Bastiat, Dickens, Dostoevsky, Lewis, and Solzhenitsyn. They were generally ignored. The historical clash was realized in the American Civil War, prosecuted by Lincoln in the quest for centralized taxing authority. Dabney's analysis is insightful.

  • Tuition:     $275 Premier    OR   Tuition:      $25 Basic
  • Mode:       asynchronous            Mode:       Self-taught
  • Offered:    Fall                            Offered:    Fall or Spring
  • Textbook:  See above                 Textbook:  See above

 

 


American History & Literature 

Instructor:  D.O. "Oliver" Woods 
E-mail: Admin@KingsWayClassicalAcademy.com
Phone: 503-658-0385

Course Description

There's no understanding American History apart from the covenant theory of civil government. Most Christian historians equate John Locke’s secularized social contract with the Biblical covenant model. However, they are direct opposites and cannot be reconciled.  You'll find out why in "The Book of the Covenant - A Handbook of Biblical Law For Leaders of Church & State."  

"Covenant & Crisis In American History" reveals critical differences in  the U.S. Constitution of 1787 and earlier covenant documents in the colonies. Key evidence is in the Preamble and Article VI. 

Failure to grasp these vital distinctions has led to a history of cultural conflict and crisis, punctuated by a violent civil war and numerous overseas conflicts. This unfolding drama is traced through seven eras.  It begins with the Puritans' noble, but abortive, attempt to establish a covenant government on American shores.   It looks in turn at the Neo-classical, Romantic, Centralization, Realist, Modern, and Deep-State eras. Each section contains an overview, timeline and representative poetry and prose.

  • Tuition:  $275
  • Mode:  Asynchronous
  • Offered: Spring 
  • Textbook: See above

American Government & Law 

Instructor:  D.O. "Oliver" Woods 
E-mail: Admin@KingsWayClassicalAcademy.com
Phone: 503-658-0385

Course Description

American Government & Law is a unique analysis of the U.S. Constitution from a Biblical vantage point. "Discipling the Nations - The Government Upon His Shoulders"  (DTN) takes a sober look at history behind the Constitution. It revisits mostly Christian, Anti-Federalist objections of men like Patrick Henry, raised in the Virginia Ratifying Convention.  Much needed critique of critical weaknesses, as well as strengths. Strengths are Biblical division of power, federalism and republicanism. 

However, the Constitution 's failure to acknowledge any Power higher than itself tacitly rejects any Divine absolutes in the civil realm. As  "The Book of the Covenant -- A Handbook of Biblical Law for Leaders of Church & State" (DC) ably demonstrates, America's social problems are rooted not primarily in our departure from the Constitution, per se.  Rather they lie in hidden seeds of humanism buried deep in the heart of the Constitution itself.  Compares Mosaic Constitution of Exodus 20-24.

  • Tuition:    $275 Premier   OR   Tuition:     $25 Basic
  • Mode:      Asynchronous          Mode:      Self-taught
  • Offered:   Fall                           Offered:   Fall or Spring
  • Textbook: See above               Textbook:  See above


Shakespeare 1 

Instructor:  Mr. Eric Cummings
E-mail: somedaysomwhere@gmail.com
Phone:  708-954-7121

Course Description

For centuries Shakespeare has delighted audiences with his wit and wisdom.  For many, he's the greatest poet the world has known and yet his identity is shrouded in speculation.  Why are his works such a mysterious admixture of both Christian and pagan allusions?  How could the Stratford man of such humble origins have written with so much insight about court life in London?  Far-fetched as it seems, the key to understanding the complex origins of America lies in the answer to those simple questions. 

Shakespeare's works fall into three genres: comedy, tragedy, and history.  This course embarks on an in-depth analysis of one each: Henry V, Hamlet, and Taming of the Shrew. Students read the play itself and an insightful commentary from a Christian perspective by Peter Leithart, taken from his Brightest Heaven of Invention - A Christian Guide to Six Shakespeare Plays.

  • Tuition:    $275 Premier   OR   Tuition:     $25 Basic
  • Mode:      Synchronous            Mode:      Self-taught
  • Offered:   Fall                           Offered:   Fall or Spring
  • Textbook: See above               Textbook:  See above

Shakespeare 2  

Instructor:  Mr. Eric Cummings 
E-mail: somedaysomewhere@gmail.com
Phone: 708-954-7121

Course Description

                                                           

For hundreds of years Shakespeare has delighted readers and audiences with his wit and wisdom. But do the writings of Shakespeare flow out of the Christian Middle Ages or launch a downward trend away from Christianity in the modern world?  In Shakespeare 2 we continue our quest in pursuit of an answer.

Shakespeare 2 focuses on three more of the most popular plays. Shakespeare's works may be divided into three genres: comedy, tragedy, and history. In this course students engage in an in-depth analysis of one each: Julius Caesar, Macbeth, and Much Ado About Nothing. Students read the play itself and an insightful commentary from a Christian perspective by Peter Leithart, taken from his Brightest Heaven of Invention - A Christian Guide to Six Shakespeare Plays.

  • Tuition:    $275 Premier   
  • Mode:      aynchronous            
  • Offered:   Fall                           
  • Textbook: See above