King's Way Classical Academy
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Great Books Intro 1: Basic, self-taught
Cost: $25.00

This course surveys 18 (100 total) of the Classical Authors and their impact on world history, from Homer to Machiavelli. The work of the Greek philosophers and Roman political theorists was answered by the life and minstry of Christ. The newly launched church challenged the Emperor cult until the conversion of Constantine (312), who marked a dramatic turning point in the history of Christianity. Previously persecuted by Rome, the church now found herself entertwined with the state for the next 700 years. Emperors appointed Bishops, often for a fee. Finally, the church broke free in the investure controversy of 1075-1122. You'll meet key players who shaped the new church/state dynamic leading up to the modern era.

  • Tuition Level: Basic ($25)
  • Stage of Trivium: Grammar
  • Mode of Instruction: Self
  • Suggested Grade Level: 7th grade
  • Offered: Self-paced
  • Required Textbooks: Keys to the Classics vol. 1 Student & Teacher Manual
  • Optional Textbook: Readings in Political Philosophy by Francis William Coker
Great Books Colloquium 1: Premier
Cost: $230.00

This is an omnibus course blending world history, philosophy, literature, and theology. Coursework integrates material from the Introductory course by requiring student to read and interact with excerpts from the Great Books, most available on-line. Instructor typically selects about half of the authors from the Intro course for in-depth reading. The student approaches reading with the objective of writing a paragraph response to a set of discussion questions, which become part of the permanent portfolio. Seminar discussion with tutor or class meets usually once a week. Student selects one author per course, for which he expands his written response into a 2000 word essay. Reading assignment ranges from 35 to 50 pages every two weeks for each classical author. Although they may be taken separately, the Great Books Colloquium is usually taken concurrently with the corresponding Great Books Introduction.

  • Stage of Trivium: Dialectic & Rhetoric
  • Mode of Instruction: Synchronous
  • Suggested Grade Level: 7th grade
  • Offered: See Schedule under Getting Started tab on the home page
  • Required Textbook: Keys to the Classics vol. 1 Student & Teacher's Manual
  • Optional Textbooks: Readings in Political Philosophy by Francis William Coker
Great Books Intro 2: Basic, self-taught
Cost: $25.00

This course surveys 16 (100 total) of the Classical Authors and their impact on world history, from Luther to Locke. Luther and Calvin challenged the corruption of an arrogant Papacy that emerged after the Investiture struggle of 1075. The Reformation called the church back to salvation by faith in the finished work of Christ. It also laid a foundation for the development of modern science and modern political theory. But key thinkers such as Francis Bacon and Richard Hooker revived natural law theories that sabatoged the biblical base. There were notable exceptions, like Samuel Rutherford and Blase Pascal, who stood against the secular tide. Nonetheless, this course explores how the work of Descartes, Locke, Newton and others created a climate of skepticism in which the 18th century Enlightenment could take root.

  • Tuition Level: Basic ($25)
  • Stage of Trivium: Grammar
  • Mode of Instruction: Self
  • Suggested Grade Level: 8th grade
  • Offered: Self-paced
  • Required Textbook: Keys to the Classics vol. 1
  • Optional Textbooks: Readings in Political Philosophy by Francis William Coker
Great Books Colloquium 2: Premier
Cost: $230.00

This is an omnibus course blending world history, philosophy, literature, and theology. Coursework integrates material from the Introductory course by requiring student to read and interact with excerpts from the Great Books, most available on-line. Instructor typically selects about half of the authors from the Intro course for in-depth reading. The student approaches reading with the objective of writing a paragraph response to a set of discussion questions, which become part of the permanent portfolio. Seminar discussion with tutor or class meets usually once a week. Student selects one author per course, for which he expands his written response into a 2000 word essay. Reading assignment ranges from 35 to 50 pages every two weeks for each classical author. Although they may be taken separately, the Great Books Colloquium is usually taken concurrently with the corresponding Great Books Introduction. Optional Textbooks: The Great Conversation I, Student and Teacher's Manual.

  • Stage of Trivium: Dialectic & Rhetoric
  • Mode of Instruction: Synchronous
  • Suggested Grade Level: 8th grade
  • Offered: See Schedule under Getting Started tab on the home page
  • Required Textbook: Keys to the Classics vol. 1
  • Optional Textbooks: Readings in Political Philosophy by Francis William Coker
Great Books Intro 3: Basic, self-taught
Cost: $25.00

This course surveys 16 (100 total) of the Classical Authors and their impact on world history, from Swift to Van Til. During the Enlightenment the idea that man can arrive at all truth on the basis of human reason alone came to fruition. In France -- nurtured by Rousseau, Voltaire, and others -- these ideas exploded in a violent reaction against the aristocracy and the church: The French Revolution. You will discover how the Revolution was more subtle and tolerant of Christianity in America, but the rejection of biblical authority over the state no less real. Thomas Jefferson and John Witherspoon were the prime movers. Kant, Comte, Marx and others nurtured the intellectual rebellion. Men like Melville, Weaver, Orwell, and Van Til stood in the breach.

  • Tuition Level: Basic ($25)
  • Stage of Trivium: Grammar
  • Mode of Instruction: Self
  • Suggested Grade Level: 9th grade
  • Offered: Self-Paced
  • Required Textbook: Keys to the Classics vol. 1
  • Optional Textbooks: Readings in Political Philosophy by Francis William Coker
Great Books Colloquium 3: Premier
Cost: $230.00

This is an omnibus course blending world history, philosophy, literature, and theology. Coursework integrates material from the Introductory course by requiring student to read and interact with excerpts from the Great Books, most available on-line. Instructor typically selects about half of the authors from the Intro course for in-depth reading. The student approaches reading with the objective of writing a paragraph response to a set of discussion questions, which become part of the permanent portfolio. Seminar discussion with tutor or class meets usually once a week. Student selects one author per course, for which he expands his written response into a 2000 word essay. Reading assignment ranges from 35 to 50 pages every two weeks for each classical author. Although they may be taken separately, the Great Books Colloquium is usually taken concurrently with the corresponding Great Books Introduction. Optional Textbooks: The Great Conversation I, Student and Teacher's Manual.

  • Stage of Trivium: Dialectic & Rhetoric
  • Mode of Instruction: Synchronous
  • Suggested Grade Level: 9th grade
  • Offered: See Schedule under Getting Started tab on the home page
  • Required Textbook: Keys to the Classics vol. 1
  • Optional Textbooks: Readings in Political Philosophy by Francis William Coker
Great Books Intro 4: Basic, self-taught
Cost: $25.00

With Great Books 4 we start over with a second sweep through the history of western civilization in somewhat greater depth (15 of 100 classical authors). This course covers the period between the ancient Greek Aeschylus and Stephen Langton, primary author of Magna Carta (1215). In this course we focus on the ancient Greek and Roman playrights and historians and also some of the heresies that plagued the early church. These included Epicureanism, Stocism, and especially neo-Platonism, among others. The church had its defenders in historians like Eusebius and Bede the Venerable, but the first thousand years were marked by a neo-Platonic retreat from the physical world. Christianity struggled to defend itself in the face of Muslim advances (Song of Roland) and Nordic/pagan influences (Beowulf).

  • Tuition Level: Basic ($25)
  • Stage of Trivium: Grammar
  • Mode of Instruction: Self
  • Suggested Grade Level: 10th grade
  • Offered: Self-paced
  • Optional Textbooks: Keys to the Classics, Vol. II (not yet available)
Great Books Colloquium 4: Premier
Cost: $230.00

This is an omnibus course blending world history, philosophy, literature, and theology. Coursework integrates material from the Introductory course by requiring student to read and interact with excerpts from the Great Books, most available on-line. Instructor typically selects about half of the authors from the Intro course for in-depth reading. The student approaches reading with the objective of writing a paragraph response to a set of discussion questions, which become part of the permanent portfolio. Seminar discussion with tutor or class meets usually once a week. Student selects one author per course, for which he expands his written response into a 2000 word essay. Reading assignment ranges from 35 to 50 pages every two weeks for each classical author. Although they may be taken separately, the Great Books Colloquium is usually taken concurrently with the corresponding Great Books Introduction.

  • Stage of Trivium: Dialectic & Rhetoric
  • Mode of Instruction: Synchronous
  • Suggested Grade Level: 10th grade
  • Offered: See Schedule under Getting Started tab on the home page
  • Optional Textbooks: Keys to the Classics, Vol. II (not yet available)
Great Books Intro 5: Basic, self-taught
Cost: $25.00

In our second sweep through the later medieval period we look even more closely at the philosophical undercurrents that foreshadowed the modern era. The stage was set with the nominalism of William of Occam and the curtain came down on the work of Johann Goethe in Germany. Occam challenged the Aristotelian particularism introduced to the church by Thomas Aquinas. He launched a long era of secularism by denying that universals have any real existence. Men begin to live out the implications. Some like Thomas A Kempis by retreating into a radical pietism. Others like Leonardo Da Vinci by trying to make sense of the world without reference to God. John Foxe recorded the martyrdom of those who held to the Biblical standard. The course examines how that standard was planted in the New World by pioneers like John Winthrop and Cotton Mather. Unfortunately, its potential was stunted by the Enlightenment rationalism of Montesquieu, Voltaire, and ultimately James Madison.

  • Tuition Level: Basic ($25)
  • Stage of Trivium: Grammar
  • Mode of Instruction: Self
  • Suggested Grade Level: 11th grade
  • Offered: Self-paced
  • Optional Textbooks: Keys to the Classics, Vol. II (not yet available)
Great Books Colloquium 5: Premier
Cost: $230.00

This is an omnibus course blending world history, philosophy, literature, and theology. Coursework integrates material from the Introductory course by requiring student to read and interact with excerpts from the Great Books, most available on-line. Instructor typically selects about half of the authors from the Intro course for in-depth reading. The student approaches reading with the objective of writing a paragraph response to a set of discussion questions, which become part of the permanent portfolio. Seminar discussion with tutor or class meets usually once a week. Student selects one author per course, for which he expands his written response into a 2000 word essay. Reading assignment ranges from 35 to 50 pages every two weeks for each classical author. Although they may be taken separately, the Great Books Colloquium is usually taken concurrently with the corresponding Great Books Introduction. Optional Textbooks: The Great Conversation I, Student and Teacher's Manual.

  • Stage of Trivium: Dialectic & Rhetoric
  • Mode of Instruction: Synchronous
  • Suggested Grade Level: 11th grade
  • Offered: See Schedule under Getting Started tab on the home page
  • Optional Textbooks: Keys to the Classics, Vol. II (not yet available)
Great Books Intro 6: Basic, self-taught
Cost: $25.00

Our second overview of the modern era begins with G.W.F. Hegel and ends with the Russian expatriate, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. Sadly, it is a tale of philosophical apostasy issuing in real world tragedy. Hegel set the stage with his theory that history is a long series of clashing and competing forces. Apart from God this is inevitable. It led of course to Darwin, but also to manipulation of reality by leaders in the various disciplines: Kierkegaard in philosophy, Mill in economics, Nietzsche in political theory, Freud in psychology, Dewey in education. The course revisits perceptive voices of protest that were raised along the way -- Scott, Tocqueville, Bastiat, Dickens, Dostoevsky, Lewis, and Solzhenitsyn. They were generally ignored. The historical clash was realized in the American Civil War, prosecuted by Lincoln in the quest for centralized taxing authority. Dabney's analysis is insightful.

  • Tuition Level: Basic ($25)
  • Stage of Trivium: Grammar
  • Mode of Instruction: Self
  • Suggested Grade Level: 12th grade
  • Offered: Self-paced
  • Optional Textbooks: Keys to the Classics, Vol. II (not yet available)
Great Books Colloquium 6: Premier
Cost: $230.00

This is an omnibus course blending world history, philosophy, literature, and theology. Coursework integrates material from the Introductory course by requiring student to read and interact with excerpts from the Great Books, most available on-line. Instructor typically selects about half of the authors from the Intro course for in-depth reading. The student approaches reading with the objective of writing a paragraph response to a set of discussion questions, which become part of the permanent portfolio. Seminar discussion with tutor or class meets usually once a week. Student selects one author per course, for which he expands his written response into a 2000 word essay. Reading assignment ranges from 35 to 50 pages every two weeks for each classical author. Although they may be taken separately, the Great Books Colloquium is usually taken concurrently with the corresponding Great Books Introduction.

  • Stage of Trivium: Dialectic & Rhetoric
  • Mode of Instruction: Synchronous
  • Suggested Grade Level: 12th grade
  • Offered: See Schedule under Getting Started tab on the home page
  • Optional Textbooks: Keys to the Classics, Vol. II (not yet available)
American History & Literature: Premier
Cost: $230.00

It is impossible to understand American History apart from the covenant theory of civil government. Most Christian historians equate John Locke’s secularized social contract with the Biblical covenant model of civil government. However, the two theories stand in direct opposition and cannot be reconciled. One involves an oath of allegiance to God and to biblical law, while the other is based on the shifting opinion of an unstable electorate.

This course demonstrates that the U.S. Constitution of 1787 overturned earlier covenant documents existing in the colonies, in favor of a man-centered, social contract. The evidence appears in the Preamble itself and in Article VI. Section III, which abolished the religious test oath: “No religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States.” The religious test oath lies at the heart of the biblical covenant model for civil government. The Constitution outlawed it.

The result of this radical departure has been a history of cultural conflict and crisis, punctuated by a violent civil war and numerous other overseas conflicts. This unfolding drama is traced through six eras of American history, beginning with the Puritans' noble, but abortive, attempt to establish a covenant government on American shores; and looking in turn at the Neo-classical, Romantic, Centralization, Realist, and Modern eras. Each section contains an overview, timeline and representative poetry and prose which illustrates the heartbeat of the historical forces at work.

  • Stage of Trivium: Dialectic & Rhetoric
  • Mode of Instruction: Synchronous
  • Suggested Grade Level: 10th grade
  • Offered: See Schedule under Getting Started tab on the home page
  • Required Textbook:Covenant & Crisis in American History
  • Supplemental Textbook: America's Christian History, The Untold Story by Gary DeMar
American Government & Law: Basic, self-taught
Cost: $25.00

American Government & Law provides a unique analysis of the U.S. Constitution from a Biblical vantage point. The course takes a sober look at some of the history behind the Constitution, revisiting the predominantly Christian, Anti-Federalist objections of men like Patrick Henry, that were raised when this important document was drafted. It goes on to provide much needed critique of its critical weaknesses as well as its strengths. Strengths include a Biblical division of power, federalism and the republican form. Foremost among the weaknesses is the fact that the Constitution neglected to acknowledge a Power higher than itself, thereby tacitly rejecting any divine absolutes. in the civil realm As this course ably demonstrates, America's social problems are rooted not primarily in our departure from the Constitution, per se, but in the humanism inherent within the very heart of the Constitution itself.

American Government & Law: Premier
Cost: $230.00

  • Stage of Trivium: Grammar
  • Mode of Instruction: Synchronous
  • Suggested Grade Level: 10th grade
  • Offered: See Schedule under Getting Started tab on the home page
  • Required Textbook: Discipling the Nations
  • Supplemental Textbook: American History by Gary DeMar
Shakespeare 1: Basic, self-taught
Cost: $25.00

For hundreds of years Shakespeare has delighted readers and audiences with his wit and wisdom. He is known as the greatest poet the world has yet produced and yet his identity is shrouded in much speculation. This course leaves that speculation to the critics and focuses on three of his plays. Shakespeare's works may be divided into three genres: comedy, tragedy, and history. In this course students engage in an in-depth analysis of one each: Henry V, Hamlet, and Taming of the Shrew. Students read the play itself and an insightful commentary from a Christian perspective by Peter Leithart, taken from his Brightest Heaven of Invention - A Christian Guide to Six Shakespeare Plays.

  • Tuition Level: Basic ($25)
  • Stage of Trivium: Rhetoric
  • Mode of Instruction: Self-paced
  • Suggested Grade Level: 11th grade
  • Offered: Self-paced
  • Optional Textbooks: Brightest Heaven of Invention by Peter Leithart
Shakespeare 2: Premier
Cost: $230.00

  • For hundreds of years Shakespeare has delighted readers and audiences with his wit and wisdom. He is known as the greatest poet the world has yet produced and yet his identity is shrouded in much speculation. This course leaves that speculation to the critics and focuses on three of his plays. Shakespeare's works may be divided into three genres: comedy, tragedy, and history. In this course students engage in an in-depth analysis of one each: Julius Caesar, Macbeth, and Much Ado About Nothing. Students read the play itself and an insightful commentary from a Christian perspective by Peter Leithart, taken from his Brightest Heaven of Invention - A Christian Guide to Six Shakespeare Plays.


  • Stage of Trivium: Rhetoric
  • Mode of Instruction: Synchronous
  • Suggested Grade Level: 11th grade
  • Offered: See Schedule under Getting Started tab on the home page
  • Required Textbooks: Brightest Heaven of Invention by Peter Leithart
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